About the data.

About the US Climate Resilience Map

Across the globe, climate-driven natural disasters are increasing in intensity and frequency. The United States is far from immune to these impacts – big and small communities alike are burning, flooding, and overheating due to rising temperatures. While the public is increasingly aware of the broader impacts of climate change, the nearer-term and closer-to-home effects of a changing climate are not in full focus. If implemented effectively, on-the-ground interventions can reduce the impacts of these events by protecting people and property – making these communities more resilient.

The Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht – Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center, with support from JPMorgan Chace & Co. and the Rockefeller Foundation, have developed and deployed a visualization tool that will help make people and communities more resilient by offering a path forward for cities by sharing proven examples of successful interventions to address their climate risks and social vulnerabilities. Unlike other climate-oriented maps, this map will highlight best practices that are helping reduce climate risks in cities and will help cities identify their own opportunity areas where these interventions can be applied and scaled.

About the Data

The US Climate Resilience Map: Pathways for City Solutions employs existing, open-source data collected from a variety of public sources. The data layers are organized into two categories, (1) climate risks and (2) social vulnerabilities. The climate risk layers include coastal flood risk, drought risk, extreme heat days, extreme precipitation days, riverine flood risk, and wildfires. The social vulnerability layers include fifteen layers grouped into sub-layers and four main layers, socioeconomic status, household composition and disability, minority status and language, and housing type and transportation.

About the data.

About the US Climate Resilience Map

Across the globe, climate-driven natural disasters are increasing in intensity and frequency. The United States is far from immune to these impacts – big and small communities alike are burning, flooding, and overheating due to rising temperatures. While the public is increasingly aware of the broader impacts of climate change, the nearer-term and closer-to-home effects of a changing climate are not in full focus. If implemented effectively, on-the-ground interventions can reduce the impacts of these events by protecting people and property – making these communities more resilient.

The Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht – Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center, with support from JPMorgan Chace & Co. and the Rockefeller Foundation, have developed and deployed a visualization tool that will help make people and communities more resilient by offering a path forward for cities by sharing proven examples of successful interventions to address their climate risks and social vulnerabilities. Unlike other climate-oriented maps, this map will highlight best practices that are helping reduce climate risks in cities and will help cities identify their own opportunity areas where these interventions can be applied and scaled.

About the Data

The US Climate Resilience Map: Pathways for City Solutions employs existing, open-source data collected from a variety of public sources. The data layers are organized into two categories, (1) climate risks and (2) social vulnerabilities. The climate risk layers include coastal flood risk, drought risk, extreme heat days, extreme precipitation days, riverine flood risk, and wildfires. The social vulnerability layers include fifteen layers grouped into sub-layers and four main layers, socioeconomic status, household composition and disability, minority status and language, and housing type and transportation.